Web Design for Change

Recycling E-waste – Best Practices

Latest update: November 2, 2020

Web Design For Change

Would like to learn more about web design? Would you like to build and maintain your own website?

THIS IS FOR YOU.

Join WEB DESIGN FOR CHANGE on Facebook to participate in discussions around these topics and to ask your questions. If you need help with something sprecific you can also book my services on an hourly basis.

Note: This information has been collected to support the choices you make.

Verena’s Design Studio has not been paid by anyone for any article and all articles are written, because I believe this to be useful information for my clients and anyone else interested.

I believe that we need to make choices that are sustainable, on the internet and in real life. I hope this information supports you to make sustainable choices as well.

Every affiliate link has a little 🦜 in front of it.

This week we will take a look at recycling e-waste at Verena’s Design Studio.

Why is this important? I’m typing this article on my laptop, you are reading it on yours, or your phone or tablet. All of these items will eventually be deemed unusable and then, what do we do?

With more and more of our lives and businesses taking place online and requiring the use of electronic devices we should make sure we know what happens to our electronics when we don't want or don't need them any more.

Not only are some of the components toxic and hazardous and can be a danger to the environment and the people dealing with them, our electronic devices also consist of rare materials, which we loose if we don't recycle them properly.

Let's take a look at what we're dealing with and what we can do.

◼︎Part I - What Happens to Your E-waste?
◼︎Part II - Recycling E-Waste - Best Practices
◼︎Part III - Re-Use: Remarkable E-waste Recycling Companies
◼︎Part IV - Web Design for Change - 5 Excellent Recycling Websites

Part II: Recycling E-Waste – Best Practices

In the last post we looked at the things that are considered e-waste and what happens if we don’t recycle e-waste correctly.

In this post we’ll take a look at what we can do to avoid e-waste and where we can take e-waste for recycling.

Like most things concerning enivironmental protection we should have been changing things a long time ago, but since most of us haven’t yet – let’s start now.

Why do we need to recycle?

Electronics contain valuable precious metals such as gold, silver, platinum, palladium, copper, tin, and zinc that can be recovered and used to make jewelry, plating, new electronics, or automotive parts. Plastic components can be recycled as well. In Germany more and more conscious providers use recycled plastic for bottles for cleaning supplies and shampoos.

When they get disposed of in the regular garbage, the reusable parts will be wasted and the chemicals will have a negative on the environment in landfills as well as when they get incinerated.

What can you do?

Try to use your devices as long as possible. Did you know that the battery of you phone lasts longer when you always keep the battery level between 20 and 80%?

Instead of buying a new phone or laptop, see if you can get a refurbished one. They often come with a longer guarantee than new ones, but usially look and work as if they were new. Most likely you will also be able to sell your old device to the company you get you refurbished item from.

For printers, fridges, radios you can often find local repair cafes, where you can prolong the life of your electronics.

If you really don’t want to keep them any more, but they are still working – you can usually donate them to charity.

If they are broken and can’t be fixed, you can bring them to your local recycler who will take care of removing the components correctly for reuse. In Germany on and offline retailers will also take back your electronic devices.

Batteries can be dropped of at local supermarkets with collection boxes or at shops such as DM or Rossmann.

And your local print supplier accepts and reuses your old printing cartridges.

Recycling e-waste is actually not that hard. But as pointed out in the last post so far only 70% of the population has access to recyclers or other facilities that will dispose of or  reuse electronic waste safely.

And even though Europe has the highest rate when it comes to recycling e-waste, it’s still below 50%. So there’s a lot of room for improvement!

In the next post we’ll take a look at some projects that have used their creativity and specialized knowledge to help reuse resources and to safe the environment by recycling!

If you’d like leave a comment, share this article with someone who might find it interesting or just let me know if you have any other questions or if this article was helpful to you. <3

More from Web Design For Change

Re-Use: 4 Remarkable E-waste Recycling Companies

Re-Use: 4 Remarkable E-waste Recycling Companies

Web Design for ChangeLatest update: November 2, 2020Web Design For Change Would like to learn more about web design? Would you like to build and maintain your own website? THIS IS FOR YOU. Join WEB DESIGN FOR CHANGE on Facebook to participate in discussions around...

read more
Recycling – What happens to your E-Waste?

Recycling – What happens to your E-Waste?

Web Design for ChangeLatest update: November 2, 2020Web Design For Change Would like to learn more about web design? Would you like to build and maintain your own website? THIS IS FOR YOU. Join WEB DESIGN FOR CHANGE on Facebook to participate in discussions around...

read more
5 Best Green Web Hosting Services 2020 – Pt. 4: Shortlist

5 Best Green Web Hosting Services 2020 – Pt. 4: Shortlist

Web Design for ChangeLatest update: September 21, 2020Web Design For Change Would like to learn more about web design? Would you like to build and maintain your own website? THIS IS FOR YOU. Join WEB DESIGN FOR CHANGE on Facebook to participate in discussions around...

read more